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It’s kids and cute calves season on Facebook. There’s nothing quite as adorable or Instagram-worthy as seeing little kids posing with the first calves of the season. Those are the moments when the cattle bug takes over. Read more

  • 0

The temperature dipped below 40 degrees Fahrenheit this week, and that means it’s time to haul out the big pot for some chili on the stovetop. Read more

  • 0

Twelve months ago, I had feelings of hope and optimism. There we were, ushering in the year 2020. The year that seemed so futuristic in novels, movies and television shows. What would the year bring us? Flying cars? Aliens? According to pop culture and science fiction, the possibilities were endless. Read more

  • Updated
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As I type this I’m sitting warm and toasty at my desk looking out my picture window at the snow falling in Dodge City. Centimeter by precious centimeter it’s accumulating on the ground, creating both a picturesque blanket and a precious moisture source for the crops and lawns in southwest Kansas. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

There’s a plot line in the Christmas movie classic “Love Actually,” when elementary schools in part of London have brought all their students together for one massive Christmas nativity production. Now, with so many children, there were only so many traditional roles to go around. So the fictional teachers found a solution. Read more

  • 0

Thirty years ago, taking photos and making home movies was a complicated hobby. The equipment was expensive and even operating the consumer versions was hard. Editing home movie footage from a VHS camcorder was not as user-friendly as today’s computer applications have made it. Read more

  • 0

Every fall, with the first hard freeze warning on the weather report, I am faced with a choice—which of my containers of annual flowers am I going to fight to save, and which will I let the frost take? Read more

  • 0

Harvest season runs hot and heavy this time of year. Shorter daylight hours and the whims of Mother Nature and Murphy’s Law tend to keep everyone on edge until the last round. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

In my closet is a box of ribbons from 11 years of 4-H projects. There are a lot of blues, a smattering of reds and whites and a few purples and rosettes. Some have writing on the tag on the back that tells me what year and for what project they were awarded. Many, though, in the haste of post-fair cleanup just got marked in the record book and put in the box. Read more

  • 0

I wasn’t really allowed pity parties as a kid. Oh, I tried, and my folks would indulge me for about 2.5 minutes and then, to paraphrase my father, it was time to stop crying and start trying. Read more

top story
  • 0

Every time I start in on a home improvement project on my pre-owned, 1950s bungalow, I typically have one thought. Read more

  • 0

According to news reports, Americans have sparked a boom in the recreational vehicle industry since the coronavirus pandemic came to our shores this spring and summer. Read more

  • 0

Like many farmers and cowboys his age, my dad adheres to a basic uniform code when dressing for a day’s work even though he’s retired and work is more like chauffeuring my mother to appointments. Read more

  • 0

This May marked 20 years I’ve been out of college. And while I have no regrets, I did think at 22 that my life would play out much more differently than it has at 42. I assumed I’d have it all figured out by now—family, career, friendships, minor household DIY, you know, the big, important things in life. But the truth is, I don’t. Read more

  • 0

It’s been two and half months of staying in my house and only venturing forth for occasional grocery pick ups, the odd drive-thru splurge and my yearly buying trip for flowers for the front yard, all while masked up like I’m an extra on M*A*S*H. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

April 17 will mark one month since I started working from home as a precaution against spreading COVID-19. I was lucky—my job is pretty portable. As long as I have my laptop, cell phone and reliable WiFi I can work. And, considering that we have staff members who have varying health conditions, I didn’t see the point in coming into the office and possibly carrying the coronavirus in like some invisible serial-killer hitchhiker. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

My calendar has never looked so empty. No trips to announce a spring cattle show. No quick jaunts to Wichita for shopping or to see a concert with friends. No juggling which producer meetings, field days and conferences we’re going to attend. This is life inside the COVID-19 curve. Read more

  • 0

Once, long ago, family refrigerators were the place for newspaper clippings. From photos of school award assemblies, to particularly funny comics that made your dad laugh, to columnists that spoke to your family’s values and experiences. Read more

  • 0

I’ve struggled with my weight my entire life. Of the three Latzke children, I was the one that you might call, “an easy gainer.” Except for a few health scares that dramatically dropped the pounds off my frame, I’ve always been in the upper percentile for growth for all 41 years I’ve been on this Earth. Read more

  • Updated
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I am by no means bilingual in any one foreign language, but I know enough of a few to get by in a foreign land. But of any of the foreign languages I do speak, maybe the handiest of them all is “consumer.” Read more

  • 0

If you’re in your 40s, like me, you are of that unique bridge generation that remembers life with a landline phone and cartoons only on Saturday mornings. We got our first email addresses in college, and learned to text by carefully pressing the number keys on a Nokia until we got the letters to spell actual words. We know the sound of a fax machine, a modem dial-up, and the THX sound card before movies about as well as we know our own mother’s voice. Read more

  • 0

Last year, I was awarded a very high, distinctive honor here at High Plains Journal. I won the first ever Christmas Cookie Decorating Contest, the prize of which was one beautiful brilliantly red poinsettia in a plastic Santa Claus container. Read more

  • 0

I don’t know where I stumbled across this phrase first, but it’s one that spoke to me the other day: “I had to make you uncomfortable, otherwise you never would have moved.” Read more

  • 0

The best cow dog I’ve ever run across was a black and white streak named “Pippi Longstocking.” (Well, what else would you expect a 7-year-old who had just read the book to call a Border Collie with four white paws?) Read more

  • 0

I was reminded violently this weekend that while in my heart I’m 22, I am, in fact, 41. My knees are 41. My muscles are 41. My liver and kidneys are 41. And my metabolism is 41. Read more

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There’s a phenomenon that happens when you cross Interstate 35 at Salina on your way west across Kansas. Read more

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“Everyone wants to change the world, but no one wants to change the toilet paper.” Read more

  • 0

A baseball cap, tank tops, shorts and flip-flops were once my summer uniform on the farm. Well, unless we were working around cattle, and then it was a baseball cap, tank top, jeans and toe-saving cowboy boots. Live and learn.  Read more

top story
  • 0

Every year I stand in the card aisle, flipping through and rejecting card after card, just trying to find the least objectionable one to send to my farmer dad for Father’s Day. Read more

  • 0

Adults tell kids a lot of half-truths. It’s partly to avoid awkwardness, partly to avoid difficult conversations, partly to keep them safe. Read more

  • 0

Dan Robbins isn’t a household name you’d recognize. But chances are some of his artistic work is still hanging in your grandparents’ finished basement with the shag carpeting, or is tucked away in a dusty box of your dad’s things in the attic. Read more

  • 0

To build a strong team, you must see someone else’s strength as a complement to your weakness not a threat to your position or authority—Christine Caine. Read more

  • 0

It’s tough deciphering your farmer’s hand gestures when you’re backing a trailer or working cattle. It can be frustrating when one partner repeatedly insists on tokens of affection and gets upset when you miss important dates because you’re in the middle of planting corn. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

I remember when I was a student back in 1996 all the attention that the jocks would get on “Signing Day.” Read more

  • 0

It’s kids and cute calves season on Facebook. There’s nothing quite as adorable or Instagram-worthy as seeing little kids posing with the first calves of the season. Those are the moments when the cattle bug takes over. Read more

  • 0

The temperature dipped below 40 degrees Fahrenheit this week, and that means it’s time to haul out the big pot for some chili on the stovetop. Read more

  • 0

Twelve months ago, I had feelings of hope and optimism. There we were, ushering in the year 2020. The year that seemed so futuristic in novels, movies and television shows. What would the year bring us? Flying cars? Aliens? According to pop culture and science fiction, the possibilities were endless. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

As I type this I’m sitting warm and toasty at my desk looking out my picture window at the snow falling in Dodge City. Centimeter by precious centimeter it’s accumulating on the ground, creating both a picturesque blanket and a precious moisture source for the crops and lawns in southwest Kansas. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

There’s a plot line in the Christmas movie classic “Love Actually,” when elementary schools in part of London have brought all their students together for one massive Christmas nativity production. Now, with so many children, there were only so many traditional roles to go around. So the fictional teachers found a solution. Read more

  • 0

Thirty years ago, taking photos and making home movies was a complicated hobby. The equipment was expensive and even operating the consumer versions was hard. Editing home movie footage from a VHS camcorder was not as user-friendly as today’s computer applications have made it. Read more

  • 0

Every fall, with the first hard freeze warning on the weather report, I am faced with a choice—which of my containers of annual flowers am I going to fight to save, and which will I let the frost take? Read more

  • 0

Harvest season runs hot and heavy this time of year. Shorter daylight hours and the whims of Mother Nature and Murphy’s Law tend to keep everyone on edge until the last round. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

In my closet is a box of ribbons from 11 years of 4-H projects. There are a lot of blues, a smattering of reds and whites and a few purples and rosettes. Some have writing on the tag on the back that tells me what year and for what project they were awarded. Many, though, in the haste of post-fair cleanup just got marked in the record book and put in the box. Read more

  • 0

I wasn’t really allowed pity parties as a kid. Oh, I tried, and my folks would indulge me for about 2.5 minutes and then, to paraphrase my father, it was time to stop crying and start trying. Read more

top story
  • 0

Every time I start in on a home improvement project on my pre-owned, 1950s bungalow, I typically have one thought. Read more

  • 0

According to news reports, Americans have sparked a boom in the recreational vehicle industry since the coronavirus pandemic came to our shores this spring and summer. Read more

  • 0

Like many farmers and cowboys his age, my dad adheres to a basic uniform code when dressing for a day’s work even though he’s retired and work is more like chauffeuring my mother to appointments. Read more

  • 0

This May marked 20 years I’ve been out of college. And while I have no regrets, I did think at 22 that my life would play out much more differently than it has at 42. I assumed I’d have it all figured out by now—family, career, friendships, minor household DIY, you know, the big, important things in life. But the truth is, I don’t. Read more

  • 0

It’s been two and half months of staying in my house and only venturing forth for occasional grocery pick ups, the odd drive-thru splurge and my yearly buying trip for flowers for the front yard, all while masked up like I’m an extra on M*A*S*H. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

April 17 will mark one month since I started working from home as a precaution against spreading COVID-19. I was lucky—my job is pretty portable. As long as I have my laptop, cell phone and reliable WiFi I can work. And, considering that we have staff members who have varying health conditions, I didn’t see the point in coming into the office and possibly carrying the coronavirus in like some invisible serial-killer hitchhiker. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

My calendar has never looked so empty. No trips to announce a spring cattle show. No quick jaunts to Wichita for shopping or to see a concert with friends. No juggling which producer meetings, field days and conferences we’re going to attend. This is life inside the COVID-19 curve. Read more

  • 0

Once, long ago, family refrigerators were the place for newspaper clippings. From photos of school award assemblies, to particularly funny comics that made your dad laugh, to columnists that spoke to your family’s values and experiences. Read more

  • 0

I’ve struggled with my weight my entire life. Of the three Latzke children, I was the one that you might call, “an easy gainer.” Except for a few health scares that dramatically dropped the pounds off my frame, I’ve always been in the upper percentile for growth for all 41 years I’ve been on this Earth. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

I am by no means bilingual in any one foreign language, but I know enough of a few to get by in a foreign land. But of any of the foreign languages I do speak, maybe the handiest of them all is “consumer.” Read more

  • 0

If you’re in your 40s, like me, you are of that unique bridge generation that remembers life with a landline phone and cartoons only on Saturday mornings. We got our first email addresses in college, and learned to text by carefully pressing the number keys on a Nokia until we got the letters to spell actual words. We know the sound of a fax machine, a modem dial-up, and the THX sound card before movies about as well as we know our own mother’s voice. Read more

  • 0

Last year, I was awarded a very high, distinctive honor here at High Plains Journal. I won the first ever Christmas Cookie Decorating Contest, the prize of which was one beautiful brilliantly red poinsettia in a plastic Santa Claus container. Read more

  • 0

I don’t know where I stumbled across this phrase first, but it’s one that spoke to me the other day: “I had to make you uncomfortable, otherwise you never would have moved.” Read more

  • 0

The best cow dog I’ve ever run across was a black and white streak named “Pippi Longstocking.” (Well, what else would you expect a 7-year-old who had just read the book to call a Border Collie with four white paws?) Read more

  • 0

I was reminded violently this weekend that while in my heart I’m 22, I am, in fact, 41. My knees are 41. My muscles are 41. My liver and kidneys are 41. And my metabolism is 41. Read more

  • 0

There’s a phenomenon that happens when you cross Interstate 35 at Salina on your way west across Kansas. Read more

  • 0

“Everyone wants to change the world, but no one wants to change the toilet paper.” Read more

  • 0

A baseball cap, tank tops, shorts and flip-flops were once my summer uniform on the farm. Well, unless we were working around cattle, and then it was a baseball cap, tank top, jeans and toe-saving cowboy boots. Live and learn.  Read more

top story
  • 0

Every year I stand in the card aisle, flipping through and rejecting card after card, just trying to find the least objectionable one to send to my farmer dad for Father’s Day. Read more

  • 0

Adults tell kids a lot of half-truths. It’s partly to avoid awkwardness, partly to avoid difficult conversations, partly to keep them safe. Read more

  • 0

Dan Robbins isn’t a household name you’d recognize. But chances are some of his artistic work is still hanging in your grandparents’ finished basement with the shag carpeting, or is tucked away in a dusty box of your dad’s things in the attic. Read more

  • 0

To build a strong team, you must see someone else’s strength as a complement to your weakness not a threat to your position or authority—Christine Caine. Read more

  • 0

It’s tough deciphering your farmer’s hand gestures when you’re backing a trailer or working cattle. It can be frustrating when one partner repeatedly insists on tokens of affection and gets upset when you miss important dates because you’re in the middle of planting corn. Read more

  • Updated
  • 0

I remember when I was a student back in 1996 all the attention that the jocks would get on “Signing Day.” Read more