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J.P. Dreul is a Nebraska farmer trying to keep Mother Nature from taking the last bits of his legacy and his sanity. Drought has fried his crops and his optimism. Every day, he faces the choice he must make to save his farm. The stability of a job in town would mean a steady income but only he can decide if the cost is too high. Read moreA Nebraska farmer tells a story from where the wildflowers grow

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Photographer Audrey Hall uses her camera lens to capture the quiet strength of America’s national mammal, the bison. Her words, along with several quotes, essays and poems from contributors, lend weight and wonder to her subject matter. Read moreThe bison’s tale

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Cowboy philosopher Will Rogers once said, regarding ignorance, “It’s not what we don’t know that gets us into trouble; it’s what we ‘know’ that just ain’t so.” Michael Shellenberger’s just-published book, Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All (HarperCollins, 2020) challenges a lot of what we “know”—or rather, what we have been told over and over again by the media—about the climate, global warming and related topics. Read moreCapitalism and agribusiness, saving the planet together

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In “The Farmer’s Son: Calving Season on a Family Farm,” John Connell shares the story of returning to his family’s farm, Birchview, in County Longford, Ireland. For generations the Connells have farmed near the River Camlin, not far from the village of Ballinalee. Their Irish ancestors were tenants of an English lord before becoming landowners themselves. Read more‘The Farmer’s Son’ a tale of family life on an Irish farm

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Journalist Amanda Little’s The Fate of Food: What We’ll Eat In A Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World, offers a refreshing, non-ideological and optimistic take on the agricultural challenge of the 21st century: feeding a growing population while reducing the climate impacts of agriculture. The book collects articles Little has published in Wired, the New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, and elsewhere on various ag tech topics.  Read moreAmanda Little’s third way

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A decline of commodity prices in major crop-growing states has shifted an emphasis on global food production, which makes a recent release a timely read. “How to Feed the World” is a fascinating read not because it spends time talking about how to build a simple road to get there but rather delves into all the roadblocks that must be addressed to meet that goal. Read moreAg experts take a look at ‘feeding the world’

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Gerd de Ley, a Belgian actor and curator of quotes, now offers “Cowboy Wisdom,” an enjoyable collection of sage advice and clever quips. In a high quality hardcover, the book will last a lifetime though, weighing in at 112 pages, it won’t take that long to read. It could take an evening or a week, if you break it up and read one chapter a night. Read more‘Cowboy Wisdom’ offers a tip of the hat to Western wit

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Honey bees can be a rewarding hobby but Norman Gary, author of “Honey Bee Hobbyist,” asks that you do one thing before you jump in. Visit an allergist to be certain you aren’t allergic to bee stings. Proper handling of bees will lessen your chances of getting stung, but, inevitably, it will happen. Once you know you are not allergic to bee stings, your next step should be to purchase this book. Read moreTaking the sting out of beekeeping

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It is often difficult to accurately portray the wide range of responsibilities on your farm and ranch to those who don’t live it everyday. Proficiencies in agronomy, record keeping, mechanical repair, marketing and animal husbandry are necessary, of course, and any given day can turn on a dime from one to another. Read moreA Nebraska family's year-long battle with weather, Keystone XL and too much corn

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In thousands of High Plains communities from the 1920s to early 2000s, a J.C. Penney department store was as common as Main Street itself. Yet, while J.C. Penney shoppers were buying Big Mac overalls, Plain Pockets jeans and Towncraft shirts, few of them knew about the merchant’s other passion—agriculture. Read moreJ.C. Penney’s contributions to agriculture are brought to life in Kruger’s book