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Photographer Audrey Hall uses her camera lens to capture the quiet strength of America’s national mammal, the bison. Her words, along with several quotes, essays and poems from contributors, lend weight and wonder to her subject matter.

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Sitting down with author Roger Ringer’s book “True Tales of Kansas” is like spending a pleasant afternoon with grandparents as they tell the stories of their friends and family. Read more

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Cowboy philosopher Will Rogers once said, regarding ignorance, “It’s not what we don’t know that gets us into trouble; it’s what we ‘know’ that just ain’t so.” Michael Shellenberger’s just-published book, Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All (HarperCollins, 2020) challenges a lot of what we “know”—or rather, what we have been told over and over again by the media—about the climate, global warming and related topics. Read more

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Historical fiction is not the traditional fare I gravitate toward. But when I had an opportunity to review “Prairie Truth” by Marilyn Bay, I decided to read it because of my own fascination with Colorado, a state my family always gravitated toward when it came to summer vacations. Read more

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When people think of Old West legends, the famed gunslinger and folk hero Wild Bill Hickok is likely to come to mind. Born James Butler Hickok, the man later known as Wild Bill inspired many fantastic stories, some of them fictional, about his adventures as a scout, spy, federal marshal, gambler, showman and actor. Read more

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Kansas joined the Union on Jan. 29, 1861, and many people know the story of its statehood and its history tied to not only the Civil War but also to the rise of political populism, the home of President Dwight D. Eisenhower and aviator Amelia Earhart. Read more

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In “The Farmer’s Son: Calving Season on a Family Farm,” John Connell shares the story of returning to his family’s farm, Birchview, in County Longford, Ireland. For generations the Connells have farmed near the River Camlin, not far from the village of Ballinalee. Their Irish ancestors were tenants of an English lord before becoming landowners themselves. Read more

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Journalist Amanda Little’s The Fate of Food: What We’ll Eat In A Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World, offers a refreshing, non-ideological and optimistic take on the agricultural challenge of the 21st century: feeding a growing population while reducing the climate impacts of agriculture. The book collects articles Little has published in Wired, the New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, and elsewhere on various ag tech topics.  Read more

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The history of the Kempton family in America is as colorful as the Montana skies when the Northern Lights are shining. Trudy Kempton Dana merges thorough research with a healthy dab of storytelling to share her family’s tales. Read more

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A decline of commodity prices in major crop-growing states has shifted an emphasis on global food production, which makes a recent release a timely read. “How to Feed the World” is a fascinating read not because it spends time talking about how to build a simple road to get there but rather delves into all the roadblocks that must be addressed to meet that goal. Read more

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Gerd de Ley, a Belgian actor and curator of quotes, now offers “Cowboy Wisdom,” an enjoyable collection of sage advice and clever quips. In a high quality hardcover, the book will last a lifetime though, weighing in at 112 pages, it won’t take that long to read. It could take an evening or a week, if you break it up and read one chapter a night. Read more

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Sarah Smarsh grew up poor in rural southern Kansas in the 1980s and 1990s. As she shares the history and experiences of her family in “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth,” Smarsh weaves in observations about American history, economics and sociology. Read more

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Honey bees can be a rewarding hobby but Norman Gary, author of “Honey Bee Hobbyist,” asks that you do one thing before you jump in. Visit an allergist to be certain you aren’t allergic to bee stings. Proper handling of bees will lessen your chances of getting stung, but, inevitably, it will happen. Once you know you are not allergic to bee stings, your next step should be to purchase this book. Read more

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Almost every Kansan knows that Cawker City is home to the World’s Largest Ball of Sisal Twine. Did you know, however, that the hassock (an ottoman that can also store stuff) was invented in the same community? Or that Richardson Manufacturing, maker of the AD Flex blade plow and mulch treader tool, also called Cawker City home? Read more

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Dale Strickler was a keynote speaker at High Plains Journal’s inaugural Soil Health U in January. He mentioned that he had written a book called “The Drought Resilient Farm,” to be published in June. We wanted a crack at reviewing the book and my review copy came a few weeks ago. Read more