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So much of my time spent publicly in 2021 has been trying to shed a little sunlight on the fact that some global powers do not want individuals to own land. Take a hard look at freedom throughout the course of human history and it tells you that land ownership goes right to the heart of liberty within mankind. Read more

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One of grain sorghum’s strengths is that it typically takes less capital to grow compared to other summer crops. However, with input costs of all commodities expected to go up this coming year, growers should be looking to cut expenses wherever possible. Read more

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A man was telling a story from about 50 years ago. Stan said that Eddie was looking at this horse that he thought he might try to buy but Eddie’s foot was hurt so he asked Stan to get on him. Read more

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I believe at least in our area the cattle numbers are shorter than some so-called experts believe. If you look at the number of cattle being sold at auction compared to previous years I think that tells part of the story. Read more

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American TV icon Ed Sullivan used to boast that viewers were about to witness “a really big show!” Well, a really big show came to Denver Sept. 9 to 10, and as always, the Beef Promotion Operating Committee meeting, where the Beef Checkoff program funding decisions are made for the next fiscal year, didn’t disappoint. Read more

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The Texas landscape today is changing quicker than ever. According to recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, an estimated 1,000 people per day are added to the state’s population. About half are natural increases due to the birth rate exceeding the death rate, but the other half migrate from outside the state. Read more

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Amidst all the chaos in today’s world, we had a fantastic weekend in Holmes County, Ohio. It is generally called Amish Country and it is certainly loaded with many Amish families who I take my hat off to in 2021 as the rest of the nation tries to achieve what they have never given up. Read more

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From a distance, the steel frame bridge with large wooden planks spanning the middle looks to be in decent shape. It’s been providing a reliable path across the Heart River in western North Dakota since the early 1920s, enabling tractors to move from fields that border both sides of the river and numerous hunters, hoping to shoot their next big trophy. Read more

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Whether it is water for cattle, resistant weeds, or the appetite of three growing boys, some things never stop. And we should not want them to. My hope is that our own hunger for progress never does either. Read more

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The calendar has turned to fall, and the weather is slowly following suit. Harvest is underway with combines rolling through fields and semis hauling grain to elevators and on-farm bins. There’s more of those bins and semis now than ever before because there’s more grain. Read more

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As I write this, my friend Andrew Henderson and “Across the Pond” radio co-host in the United Kingdom is on his eighth day of in-home recovery from COVID-19. He said, “This bio-weapon is a horrible experience.” Read more

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Because of wet, cool weather during the late spring grain sorghum planting was delayed in many regions. In addition, good soil moisture following wheat harvest allowed for sorghum to be double cropped in some locations. Read more

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In 1986 I was told by a friend to meet Fred Madsen. Trained as a biochemist, he somehow started giving nutritional consultation to zoos, which led him into formulating diets for pigs. Read more

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I find that most people today have very little connection to farming or ranching. When I grew up in the late 1960s and 1970s, there seemed to be a general sense that most people knew where their food came from. In my youth in suburban Connecticut, there was agriculture all around the area. Read more

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The 75th annual National Barrow Show has come to an end in Austin, Minnesota. Like all livestock events, this hog show has undergone the same evolution of change necessary to meet the needs of the people participating. Read more

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I hope you had the chance to see the Army football team honor the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorists attacks during its first home game of the season. Read more

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Many avid hunters are already planning for deer season, which begins Oct. 2 for bowhunters and Nov. 7 for general firearms season. Landowners who participate in special management programs within the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department can begin harvesting deer Oct. 2 with a firearm, as well. Read more

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Despite decades of federal and state investments in farm programs and rural economic development, most of rural America is still losing population while urban America is gaining. Read more

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To farmers and ranchers, it seems like agriculture gets more than its share of blame for whatever problem grabs headlines. Climate and, more specifically, greenhouse gas emissions are no exception. Read more

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In late summer 2019 I was sitting at a kitchen table interviewing the man I would marry two years later. I wrote about him then with the byline Newlin and I’m writing about him now with the recently acquired surname Vilhauer. Marriage is always a significant commitment, but to enter into holy matrimony with a farmer is something different altogether. As many farm wives know, when you marry a farmer, you also marry the farm in a sense. Read more

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China. Has there ever been a time that one word has generated as much anxiety as that word does in today’s world? China is buying farms left and right throughout the nation but nowhere faster than in Oklahoma. Read more

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As we finish out the summer, drought conditions are still a big concern in parts of the Plains. The northern Plains have been especially hard hit where the Dakotas currently have the worst drought conditions. In North Dakota, ranchers are having to sell cattle due to lack of feed. Many are also cutting failed cash crops, according to the National Weather Service. Read more

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Between the corndogs and the carnival, the Missouri State Fair is always a whirlwind of seeing old friends and new, watching 4-H and FFA members show their prized livestock and taking in all of the best of Missouri agriculture. While you enjoyed the coldest milk on the fairgrounds—chocolate, if you’re like me—I hope you had a chance to visit the various displays in the Farm Bureau building, including a showcase of over 200 years of Missouri’s number one industry. Read more

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Looking ahead to the United States Department of Agriculture’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report for September, many traders will be eager to see if there will be any adjustments made to yield after the dramatic decline in yield that was forecast in the August report.

The September report will be watched by the world. After all, now there are six major agricultural commodities with tight ending stocks—corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, canola and cotton. On Sept. 10, initially traders will watch the yield numbers released by the USDA. Are they higher or lower than trade expectations, and by how much? Next traders will focus on total supply, and changes to demand, and how that equates to ending stocks. Read more

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Ever been thrown a curve ball? Whether in business or on the farm, right now it is something we all have in common with the Great Bambino. Read more

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One of the greatest dangers to our rural way of life is allowing people on the coasts (people who often have never visited, much less lived in, our communities) make decisions in an ideological “vacuum” regarding our local natural resources, economies, customs and culture, and property rights. The Trump Administration fully understood that local governments have the expertise to advocate for our economic, environmental and social well-being because we elect those officials from our commu… Read more

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Many, many moons ago on a trip to pick up two donkeys in Missouri, I came home with 18 pregnant goats. By golly, just like that we were in the goat business. Read more