editor's pick
  • Updated
  • 0

The color purple ruled the 2019 National Festival of Breads baking competition, June 8. Which was only appropriate, considering the festival is held in Manhattan, Kansas, every other year.

editor's pick top story
  • Updated
  • 0

The June 11 World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed the effects of trade and weather on crops and livestock in the United States.

  • 0

According to USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service, Agricultural Statistics Board, on June 11, winter wheat production is forecast at 1.27 billion bushels, up less than 1 percent from the May 1 forecast and up 8 percent from 2018.

  • 0

Three North Dakota farmers shared their tips, tricks and struggles in growing wheat with fellow farmers and agronomists during the Wheat U event. Agweek, High Plains Journal and BASF hosted Wheat U on Jan. 17, in Bismarck.

editor's pick
  • 0

The Oklahoma Wheat Commission held the first “All You Knead to Know” artisan and grain workshop in Stillwater, Oklahoma, May 15. The workshop focused consumer satisfaction and research developments that will add value to wheat.

  • 0

Mike Frohlich is the co-founder of Laughing Sun Brewery. At Wheat U he discussed the importance of using quality wheat and other ingredients to enhance the flavor profile and make the best beer possible.

  • 0

Agricultural Research Service scientists and their partners published a study June 10 that should boost efforts to develop new varieties of wheat that are better equipped to resist a fungal disease that threatens global wheat production each year.

  • 0

As most farmers and many non-farmers know, stripe rust is nobody's friend. Seeing this dangerous disease on your crop can be devastating to a farmer's yield. The good news is, there are researchers trying to resolve this issue for you. In Manhattan, Kansas, research specialists at USDA are s…

  • 0

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed the discovery of genetically engineered wheat plants growing in an unplanted agricultural field in Washington state. The GE wheat in question is resistant to glyphosate, commonly referred to as Roun…

  • 0

U.S. Wheat Associates and the National Association of Wheat Growers are aware that USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed the discovery of genetically engineered wheat plants growing in an unplanted agricultural field in Washington State. APHIS says the GE wheat in q…

editor's pick
  • 0

For the first time, the Texas A&M AgriLife Wheat Field Day at the Bushland, Texas, Agricultural Experiment Station “took the show on the road” with a bus tour of wheat plots across the Panhandle. Stops included irrigated wheat trials at Bushland and near Dalhart, triticale plots near Conlen, and dryland wheat trials near Groom. 

  • 0

With a passion for agriculture and research, the 2019 recipient of the Herb Clutter Memorial Scholarship is Jorja Elliott of Pratt, Kansas. This $500 scholarship will help Elliott pursue her degree in biology with an emphasis in botany at Fort Hays State University - where she has already be…

  • 0

The 2019 Colorado Wheat Field Days will be held June 13 to 19 at 11 different variety trial sites throughout eastern Colorado. The field days are jointly hosted by the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee, the Colorado Association of Wheat Growers, the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation, …

  • 0

With the abundance of moisture most of the state has received in the last few weeks planting a cover crop after wheat harvest may be a viable option. A cover crop can help suppress herbicide resistant weeds, reduce evaporation, provide good quality forage for livestock and provide many other…

  • 0

Manley, Nebraska—I found myself wishing for a patio set a couple of days ago. I’ve never had one. There are so many cute sets with matching pillows and I try to tell myself that maybe it would be OK to purchase one. After all, they are on sale right now. And then the practical side of my bra…

  • 0

How are we already on the backside of May? I’m Lindsey Orgain with Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma.

  • 0

Greenfield, Iowa—For some of you this is our first time meeting and for others we are reconnecting again. Either way, it’s exciting we are all here to share the 2019 wheat harvest together! I am Brian G. Jones of Greenfield, Iowa, and I am a fourth generation farmer and a second generation w…

top story
  • 0

Hi, my name is Laura, and my family are harvesters. Yes, I’m stating the obvious, but some say the first step to recovery is admitting you have an issue. And our issue is being harvesters. Why anyone would lay it all on the line to chase a crop that may or may not make it to harvest is beyon…

editor's pick
  • 0

U.S. agriculture interests took a big breath May 17, with the announcement that Section 232 Tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada and Mexico would be removed. President Donald Trump had imposed tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum in March 2018, under a 1962 Cold War-era t…

editor's pick top story
  • 0

It was one of the recurring story lines of the 2019 Wheat Quality Council Hard Winter Wheat Tour April 29 to May 2—there sure seems to be a lot of farmers choosing to graze out their wheat this year. 

And while producers up and down the High Plains have grazed out their wheat from time to time, Oklahoma farmers and cattlemen have decades of experience in the practice.

The choice between taking a wheat crop to grain harvest, or choosing to use it for stocker cattle gains has many different triggers, explained Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Market economist, and Kim Anderson, professor and Extension economist. It’s worth taking a look at what factors played a roll in this year’s decisions so that farmers might identify future opportunities.

editor's pick top story
  • 0

The cooler and wetter growing conditions around Oklahoma this spring have benefited the wheat and winter canola crops. But it’s also been ideal for armyworm and variegated cutworm survival, explained Tom Royer, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension entomologist in his May 13, Pest …

  • 0

Missouri wheat growers should scout fields and prepare to spray now to prevent Fusarium head blight, also called scab, says University of Missouri Extension plant pathologist Kaitlyn Bissonnette.

  • 0

Mercaris, a market data and auctions startup supporting the growth of organic and non-GMO agriculture in the U.S., today released its monthly market update for May, reporting the potential for a highly mixed, but generally positive, year for organic winter wheat yields.

editor's pick top story
  • 0

The May 10 Crop Production report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's  National Agricultural Statistics Service is bullish on wheat production numbers. This despite a soggy April that caused flooding across much of the winter wheat growing region as well as market signals that are tell…

editor's pick top story
  • 0

Traditionally, the Oklahoma State University Extension’s annual field day at the North Central Research Station near Lahoma, Oklahoma, is a time to celebrate wheat. But this year, with the wet spring and the price of wheat compared to other commodities, much of the program May 10, was catere…

editor's pick
  • 0

Illegal and unlicensed are never good words to hear in the wheat industry and, in the end, you usually get what you pay for or have to pay millions for your indiscretions. Dustin Kelley knows the ramifications of selling illegal seed wheat. A federal court in Kansas recently awarded Oklahoma…

  • 0

The annual Wheatheart Wheat Field Day, hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offices in Ochiltree, Lipscomb and Hansford counties, will be May 21.

  • 0

True armyworms have been found in grass pastures in south-central Missouri. Farmers should begin scouting pastures, wheat, and corn fields.

  • 0

The Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station and Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service will hold the 2019 Lahoma Wheat Field Day on May 10 at the North Central Research Station.

editor's pick
  • 0

Updated 2 p.m.—In an interview with High Plains Journal, North Dakota Grain Growers Association President Jeff Mertz filled out more details about the state organization’s departure from National Association of Wheat Growers. As a primarily spring wheat producing state, North Dakota has issu…

editor's pick top story
  • 0

The final tally of the 2019 Wheat Quality Council Hard Winter Wheat Tour, April 30 to May 2:

• 469 total stops in Kansas, Nebraska and Oklahoma;

• 74 participants; and

• 47.2 bushel-per-acre average estimated yield potential.

The tour participants estimated that the final tally at harvest based on the snapshot of the wheat observed on this three-day tour with all conditions favorable should reach 306.5 million bushels in Kansas.

But, as Kansas State University Extension wheat specialist Romulo Lollato observed, a lot can happen between now and harvest. Already, May 5 saw an outbreak of tornadoes and thunderstorms across much of the wheat-growing region of the state from Meade to Hutchinson. Meanwhile, May 6, the forecast called for more thunderstorms and baseball-sized hail in parts of much of western and southwestern Kansas.

  • 0

A team of Kansas State University wheat scientists are tapping into 10,000 years of evolution in the plant’s genetic code as part of their continued efforts to understand how historic processes that shaped modern wheat can help to improve the varieties grown by today’s farmers.

  • 0

A wide range of information about crop varieties, markets and best management practices will be featured at the Oklahoma State University Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources’ Wheat Field Day near Lahoma on May 10at Oklahoma State’s North Central Research Station.

  • 0

The Texas Wheat Producers Board held its biennial election to fill five expiring seats. Based on the results of the election, four nominees were reelected and one nominee was newly elected to serve six-year terms on the board.

  • 0

In the past decade, scientists have been reporting that America’s move from burning coal to natural gas and low-sulfur coal has led to a large decrease in the amount of atmospheric sulfur, compared to 40 years ago.

  • 0

Archer Daniels Midland Company announced in a news release April 25 that it is realigning its flour milling footprint in the United States as its new, high-capacity mill in Mendota, Illinois, nears opening.

  • 0

Wheat buyers from Morocco and Tunisia got an up-close look at the intricacies and reliability of the U.S. grain infrastructure during the April 12 to 19 Cochran Fellowship Program’s experience in Kansas and Texas. Morocco and Tunisia are part of the Middle East-East and North Africa region, …

  • 0

A Kansas State University wheat expert says that yellowing in some Kansas wheat fields is not uncommon for this time of year, but growers should be aware of steps they should be taking if they are seeing the condition.

  • 0

Two new wheat varieties have been announced by Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the TAM Wheat Improvement Program, according to Jackie Rudd, AgriLife Research wheat breeder at Amarillo.

  • 0

Andrew Friskop is an Extension Plant Pathologist at North Dakota State University. At Wheat U, sponsored by High Plains Journal and BASF, Jan. 17 he spoke about identifying diseases and managing them.

  • 0

Tom Peters worked for 25 years in biotechnology and now is the extension sugar beet agronomist and weed control specialist for North Dakota State University and the University of Minnesota. He can boil his weed control presentation down into two points.

“The first one is technology by itself isn’t going to solve our problems with weeds,” he said. “The second thing is weed management is a learning experience.”

Peters gave his talk, “Hogtied by Pigweed,” during Wheat U on Jan. 17 in Bismarck. Wheat U was sponsored by Agweek, High Plains Journal and BASF to give a specialized education in wheat management.