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There was a time when passing out recipe booklets and samples at the grocery store were the height of reaching a consumer audience. Back when housewives physically wandered the aisles with their coupons and their lists, doing the daily shopping, it was easy for farmers and ranchers to reach …

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A 65-year comparative analysis between U.S. yields of irrigated and rain-fed crops has sounded a message to farmers, land managers and policymakers: Mind the gap.

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The sun beats down as Jeff Noel stares out at miniature fields of wheat near Yuma, Arizona. These aren’t the sprawling yellow fields of grain from western Nebraska. Each mini field or plot measures less than 75 square feet. As the director of Husker Genetics, part of Noel’s job is production…

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Folks across the country find all kinds of ways to celebrate their favorite universities and sports teams.

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It was supposed to be a speech about energy in Pennsylvania on Aug. 13 but President Donald Trump strayed from his prepared remarks to discuss trade with Japan.

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American farmers were unable to plant more than 19 million acres to crops this year. That’s the most prevented plant acres reported since 2007, and nearly 17.5 million acres more than were reported this time last year.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency released its Crop Acreage Data Report Aug. 12.

“Of those prevented plant acres, more than 73% were in 12 Midwestern states, where heavy rainfall and flooding this year has prevented many producers from planting mostly corn, soybeans and wheat,” according to the release.

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its hotly anticipated monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates on Aug. 12. This report was expected to show the updated July USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service acreage numbers for corn and soybeans. 

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The 43rd annual Randall County Ag Day and Crops Tour, hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, is set for Aug. 27 at the Kuhlman Extension Center, 200 N. Brown Road, Canyon.

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Kansas, along with numerous other states across the United States, was dealt severe rainfall and abnormal weather conditions this spring and early summer. The rainfall and cool temperatures invited a breeding ground for various diseases, most notably Fusarium head blight, or head scab.

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Romulo Lollato and Jourdan Bell will be headlining sessions you won’t want to miss Aug. 14 at the Sorghum U/Wheat U event at the Kansas Star Event Center in Mulvane, Kansas. 

The combined event will give wheat and sorghum producers practical learning opportunities they can take home to implement on their own fields.

Lollato, assistant professor, wheat and forages, Kansas State University, will walk wheat producers through the latest practical research that they can take back to their farms in the coming year to improve their yield and quality production goals. 

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service announced July 12 it has determined that genetically engineered wheat found in Washington state in June are varieties MON 71300 and MON 71700 that were developed by Monsanto (now owned by Bayer CropScience.)

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Gov. Pete Ricketts reappointed Bob Delsing of Hemingford, Nebraska, and Mark Knobel of Fairbury, Nebraska, as directors for Districts 1 and 6 respectively on the Nebraska Wheat Board. This will be the second term for both Delsing and Knobel.

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Throughout the ages, farmers have planted wheat seed saved from their previous crop. When making seed wheat decisions, they selected the best quality seed from the highest yielding varieties.

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The U.S. Wheat Associates Board of Directors seated new officers at its recent annual meeting in Whitefish, Montana. USW is the export market development organization representing U.S. wheat farmers.

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While rainfall is important for crop production, the amounts falling across the High Plains have negatively impacted row crops and agricultural operations, with potential effects extending into the summer growing season, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

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Kansas State University Extension Plant Pathologist Erick DeWolf cautions that some growers in central and eastern Kansas are reporting symptoms of Fusarium head blight, or head scab, in their fields this year.

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When U.S. Wheat Associates was planning its 2019 Mexico Wheat Trade Conference, no one anticipated that the threat of new tariffs on Mexican imports would come just days before the meeting started.

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Can a small circuit board, barely the size of a credit card, help the world’s wheat to beat the heat? Kansas State University researchers think so, and they say that they’ve built the world’s first facility to help them prove it.

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The color purple ruled the 2019 National Festival of Breads baking competition, June 8. Which was only appropriate, considering the festival is held in Manhattan, Kansas, every other year.

Both grand prize winners—Merry Graham of Newhall, California, and RaChelle Hubsmith of North Logan, Utah—featured the color in their winning recipes. Graham’s Blackberry Ginger Speculaas Danish Wreath with ribbons of purple blackberry jam topped the Food Blogger Division, while Hubsmiths’ Chai Ube Rosette Rolls, featuring purple sweet potatoes as a key ingredient, won the Home Baker Division.

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The June 11 World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture showed the effects of trade and weather on crops and livestock in the United States.

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According to USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service, Agricultural Statistics Board, on June 11, winter wheat production is forecast at 1.27 billion bushels, up less than 1 percent from the May 1 forecast and up 8 percent from 2018.

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Three North Dakota farmers shared their tips, tricks and struggles in growing wheat with fellow farmers and agronomists during the Wheat U event. Agweek, High Plains Journal and BASF hosted Wheat U on Jan. 17, in Bismarck.

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The Oklahoma Wheat Commission held the first “All You Knead to Know” artisan and grain workshop in Stillwater, Oklahoma, May 15. The workshop focused consumer satisfaction and research developments that will add value to wheat.

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Mike Frohlich is the co-founder of Laughing Sun Brewery. At Wheat U he discussed the importance of using quality wheat and other ingredients to enhance the flavor profile and make the best beer possible.

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Agricultural Research Service scientists and their partners published a study June 10 that should boost efforts to develop new varieties of wheat that are better equipped to resist a fungal disease that threatens global wheat production each year.

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As most farmers and many non-farmers know, stripe rust is nobody's friend. Seeing this dangerous disease on your crop can be devastating to a farmer's yield. The good news is, there are researchers trying to resolve this issue for you. In Manhattan, Kansas, research specialists at USDA are s…

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed the discovery of genetically engineered wheat plants growing in an unplanted agricultural field in Washington state. The GE wheat in question is resistant to glyphosate, commonly referred to as Roun…

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U.S. Wheat Associates and the National Association of Wheat Growers are aware that USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has confirmed the discovery of genetically engineered wheat plants growing in an unplanted agricultural field in Washington State. APHIS says the GE wheat in q…

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For the first time, the Texas A&M AgriLife Wheat Field Day at the Bushland, Texas, Agricultural Experiment Station “took the show on the road” with a bus tour of wheat plots across the Panhandle. Stops included irrigated wheat trials at Bushland and near Dalhart, triticale plots near Conlen, and dryland wheat trials near Groom. 

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With a passion for agriculture and research, the 2019 recipient of the Herb Clutter Memorial Scholarship is Jorja Elliott of Pratt, Kansas. This $500 scholarship will help Elliott pursue her degree in biology with an emphasis in botany at Fort Hays State University - where she has already be…

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The 2019 Colorado Wheat Field Days will be held June 13 to 19 at 11 different variety trial sites throughout eastern Colorado. The field days are jointly hosted by the Colorado Wheat Administrative Committee, the Colorado Association of Wheat Growers, the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation, …

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With the abundance of moisture most of the state has received in the last few weeks planting a cover crop after wheat harvest may be a viable option. A cover crop can help suppress herbicide resistant weeds, reduce evaporation, provide good quality forage for livestock and provide many other…

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Manley, Nebraska—I found myself wishing for a patio set a couple of days ago. I’ve never had one. There are so many cute sets with matching pillows and I try to tell myself that maybe it would be OK to purchase one. After all, they are on sale right now. And then the practical side of my bra…

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How are we already on the backside of May? I’m Lindsey Orgain with Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma.

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Greenfield, Iowa—For some of you this is our first time meeting and for others we are reconnecting again. Either way, it’s exciting we are all here to share the 2019 wheat harvest together! I am Brian G. Jones of Greenfield, Iowa, and I am a fourth generation farmer and a second generation w…

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Hi, my name is Laura, and my family are harvesters. Yes, I’m stating the obvious, but some say the first step to recovery is admitting you have an issue. And our issue is being harvesters. Why anyone would lay it all on the line to chase a crop that may or may not make it to harvest is beyon…