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Wichita, Kansas, will be hosting the American Forage and Grassland Council annual conference, Jan. 9 to 12, 2022. The meeting will be held at the downtown Hyatt Regency, with over 300 scientists, students, land managers, and industry leaders attending to hear presentations and to view the latest developments in technology advancing the field of forages in Kansas and throughout the U.S. Read more

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Tyler Ediger and his father, Darwin, are seasoned veterans of the National Wheat Yield Contest, having submitted entries from their farming operation near Meade since the start of the contest six years ago. That experience—combined with informed management and nearly perfect growing conditions—made it no surprise that the father-son duo took first and second place for the state of Kansas in the 2021 contest. Read more

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Time is running out for students to apply for the National Sorghum Foundation and BASF joint scholarship for the 2021-2022 school year. Two $2,500 scholarships will be awarded for tuition. Read more

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In order to store soil moisture prior to spring planting of grain sorghum, it is critical to control weeds during the winter months.

This is best achieved with a combination of soil residual herbicides and products that control weeds that have already emerged. The most common winter weeds are marestail, prickly lettuce, Canadian thistle, henbit and numerous mustard species in addition to several winter grasses. Although kochia is not considered a winter weed, it is increasingly becoming a problem in the late winter. Read more

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The Kansas Department of Agriculture has funds available for reimbursement to Kansas specialty crop growers who attend an educational conference with a primary focus on specialty crops. Qualifying conferences may include sessions about production practices, specialized equipment and technology, pest and disease management, specialty crop marketing practices, or business principles for specialty crop producers. Read more

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Did you know a chile cultivar developed at New Mexico State University is being grown aboard the International Space Station? The NuMex 'Española Improved' pepper is part of NASA's Plant Habitat-04 experiment, and NMSU graduates are among the researchers and scientists who helped chile find its way to space. Read more

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Small farms are an integral part of the food supply chain, providing nutrient-rich foods on a local level and supporting community-based farming, said Mike Popp, professor of agricultural economics and faculty advisor with the Center for Arkansas Farms and Foods. Read more

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With crops, farmers will adapt—they always have and always will. To help this adaptation, however, a Texas A&M AgriLife research project has used artificial intelligence modeling to determine what traits cultivars will need to be successful under changing climate conditions. Read more

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Wet weather has delayed the corn harvest for Craig Huxtable, but past experience has taught him to be prepared for any fall harvest scenario. Read more

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Want to improve your understanding of crop marketing at your own pace with an online course? The Online Crop Marketing Course is a non-credit professional certificate course offered by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach and registration is now open. Read more

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Finding ways to save money is top of mind for farmers. Facing high input costs and expected supply chain delays for months to come, every purchase decision has become that much more important this year. Farmers should be looking for ways to get more value from every purchase they make on the farm—keeping in mind that value goes far beyond price. CommoditAg by Farmers Edge works directly with local retailers and suppliers to provide farmers with more options and added value on their purchases. Read more

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The Ralph Lauren Corporate Foundation and the Soil Health Institute recently announced a founding grant to launch the Institute’s U.S. Regenerative Cotton Fund, a unique, farmer-facing, science-based initiative that will support long-term, sustainable cotton production in the United States, with the goal of eliminating 1 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent from the atmosphere by 2026. Read more

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Technology—from continually evolving machinery, to hybrid crops, to the capture and use of data—has transformed agriculture over the past century. Yet all of these innovations are dependent on the same thing, which has been at the heart of agriculture since its beginnings. Read more

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West Texas farmers dealing with high-salinity water and limited irrigation need an alternative crop, such as canola, that’s adaptable to harsh conditions. Texas A&M AgriLife research will soon evaluate the potential for canola as an alternative crop amid the region’s marginal water sources and extended periods of dry weather. Read more

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Look at a line graph that tracks freight markets over the last two years and you may mistake it for the very waves the vessels traverse on the open ocean. Up and down the vessel goes, and so have the rates. Read more

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Citizen scientists are needed to hunt for stink bugs that damage vegetables, field crops and landscape ornamentals. The Great Stink Bug Challenge team seeks citizen scientists ages 12 and older to trap stink bugs and record information about them, says University of Missouri Extension entomologist Kevin Rice. Read more

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Fall rain and snow are good for wheat and next year’s crops, but they do have drawbacks. One challenge is its impact on cornstalk feed quality. Read more

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Having cornstalks to graze is a great resource for livestock producers. For dry cows, it is a relatively inexpensive feed that can typically meet or come very close to meeting nutritional needs. Grazing can also help get rid of corn remaining in the field and help reduce volunteer corn the following year. Read more

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In a profession that involves backbreaking labor, life-altering financial decisions and the favor of Mother Nature, farmers and ranchers are especially vulnerable to mental health issues. Read more

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It happens often in our world; the one who does most of the work behind the scenes gets almost none of the credit and is undervalued for their talents. Alfalfa is often the underestimated plant in the agriculture world, known mainly for the hay it produces, but it offers much more than that.

Bruce Anderson, Extension forage specialist emeritus at the University of Nebraska, spoke at High Plains Journal’s Farmer U & Trade Show about alfalfa’s underrated qualities and how it can be an advantageous addition to many cropping systems.

Most producers pair alfalfa with corn to see yield benefits with the alfalfa rotation. Anderson used an example of a study in which the first year of corn following alfalfa increased yields between 9 to 18% and the following year corn yields continued to see boosts. Aside from the benefits to yield, alfalfa can also be a game changer when it comes to weed populations. Read more

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Withstanding weather challenges, disease pressure and more, Kansas farmers once again proved how informed management can maximize yield potential year-in and year-out during the 2021 National Wheat Yield Contest. National and state winners were recently released by the National Wheat Foundation, which organizes the competition. Read more

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The Purdue University/CME Group Ag Economy Barometer recorded a drop in producer sentiment in October, down 3 points to a reading of 121. The modest drop was part of a three-month slide for the index primarily due to producers’ weakened perceptions for both current and future conditions in the production agriculture sector. The Index of Current Conditions was down 5 points to a reading of 140, while the Index of Future Expectations fell 2 points to a reading of 114. The Ag Economy Barome… Read more

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The U.S. Cotton Trust Protocol, a farm level, science-based program that sets a new standard in more sustainably grown cotton, recently celebrated one year since its official launch. The Trust Protocol brings quantifiable and verifiable goals and measurement to sustainable cotton production and drives continuous improvement in six key sustainability metrics: land use, soil carbon, water management, soil loss, greenhouse gas emissions and energy efficiency. Read more

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The Texas Wheat Symposium will be Dec. 1, in conjunction with the Amarillo Farm and Ranch Show in the Grand Plaza Room at the Amarillo Civic Center. The free event will begin at 10:30 a.m. Read more

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PrairieFood, developer of an innovative approach to converting waste biomass into safe, valuable, high-carbon products for agriculture and other sectors, announces the ribbon cutting of its facility in Pratt, Kansas, along with the PrairieFood Forum + Soil Health Workshop. The ribbon cutting ceremony will be at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 15 at Pratt Municipal Airport.

The PrairieFood Forum + Soil Health Workshop begins at 1 p.m. at the Pratt County 4-H building, 81 Lake Road, Pratt. Read more

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Soybean cyst nematode is the leading cause of soybean yield loss in North America, and two industry allies are taking action to prevent loss due to SCN. BASF Agricultural Solutions, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, and The SCN Coalition have designated October as SCN Action Month to provide growers with the information needed to make sound, successful agronomic decisions to defend against this devastating pest. Read more

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As we head into the last two months of 2021, and look forward into 2022, there continue to be many unanswered questions for the grain markets. Read more

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From concrete jungle to bountiful urban garden, the 12-acre Urban County Farm in Garland teaches Texans about the farm-to-plate journey in an urban environment. Teaming up with Dallas County officials, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service mobilized the strong, local Texas Master Gardener volunteer network to combat local food insecurity by teaching residents about vegetable farming on a small scale. Read more

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Needing timely rains and having drought concerns are always on the minds of High Plains grains producers and this year is no exception.

“Right now we are starting to close on the end of soybean harvest and the milo is ready,” said Kent Winter, a Mount Hope, Kansas, farmer on Oct. 25. “We are focusing on soybeans. We are trying to get ahead of a forecasted storm Tuesday night (Oct. 26).”

The philosophy is to minimize shattering in soybeans that could result from severe weather, and the sorghum is in better condition to handle that stress.

Winter is president of the Kansas Grain Sorghum Producers Association and he said drought was a persistent concern on his farm this year. Read more